Saturday marked the 55th anniversary of white supremacists’ deadly bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The act of terror by four members of the KKK at the historic Black church killed four little girls: 14-year-olds Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley and 11-year-old Denise McNair. Nearly two dozen others were injured in the blast that used dynamite.

The 16th Street Baptists Church planned to hold a memorial service on Saturday for the anniversary. Sen. Doug Jones, who successfully prosecuted two men for the bombing decades ago, was expected to deliver the keynote speech during the morning event.

The community reacted to Birmingham Church Bombing in protest, which resulted in a violent reaction from police.

The church was a frequent meeting place for prominent civil rights leaders and leading Black voices, including Martin Luther King Jr. In fact, it was those fateful series of events that help prompt King’s famous Letter From Birmingham that “his decision not to call off the demonstrations in the face of continued bloodshed at the hands of local law enforcement officials,” History.com reminded readers.

President Barack Obama would go on to sign a bill awarding the four young victims of the tragic 1963 Birmingham church bombing with the Congressional Gold Medal.

Barbara Cross, a friend of the girls who survived the church bombing, recently recalled to TIME how close she was to possibly being a fifth death.

“I will never stop crying thinking about it,” said Cross, 68, who was 13 at the time.

The last surviving bomber was denied parole in 2016 and remained in prison for his role in the mass murder.

Keep scrolling to see vintage images paired with more recent pictures from the bombing, it’s violent aftermath and resulting protests.

16th Street Baptist Church Birmingham Bombing Photos, Then And Now was originally published on newsone.com

1. Bomb-damaged trailers at the Gaston Motel, Birmingham, Alabama

Bomb-damaged trailers at the Gaston Motel, Birmingham, Alabama

UNITED STATES – CIRCA 1963: Bomb-damaged trailers at the Gaston Motel, Birmingham, Alabama (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images) color image,people,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,law,african ethnicity,city,destruction,damaged,archival,american culture,human interest,furious,1960-1969,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bomb,bombing,motel

2. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 05: 16th Street Baptist Church, site of the September 15, 1963 Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama on July 5, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) photography,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,architecture,gulf coast states,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

3. Bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney

Bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney

UNITED STATES – CIRCA 1963: African Americans viewing the bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney, Birmingham, Alabama (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images) color image,people,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,law,african-american ethnicity,looking,african ethnicity,damaged,archival,american culture,human interest,naacp,furious,1960-1969,lawyer,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bomb,bombing,black history in the us

4. SEP 22 1963; James Meredith; ‘Bombing is a profession.’; James Meredith told a Denver audience of 1,

SEP 22 1963; James Meredith; ‘Bombing is a profession.’; James Meredith told a Denver audience of 1,

SEP 22 1963; James Meredith; ‘Bombing is a profession.’; James Meredith told a Denver audience of 1,400 Sunday not to be surprised if ‘many, many’ more are killed – like the children of Birmingham – in the civil rights struggle.; (Photo By Duane Howell/The Denver Post via Getty Images) vertical,arts culture and entertainment,usa,child,archival,audience,denver,1960-1969,sunday,human rights

5. Obama Designates Congressional Gold Medal For Church Bombings

Obama Designates Congressional Gold Medal For Church Bombings

WASHINGTON, DC – MAY 24: US President Barack Obama (4th L) signs a bill in the Oval Office designating the Congressional Gold Medal to commemorate the four young girls killed during the 1963 bombing of 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, as (L-R) Birmingham Mayor William Bell, Dr Sharon Malone Holder, Attorney General Eric Holder, Rep Terri Sewell (D-AL), Thelma Pippen McNair, mother of Denise McNair, Lisa McNair, sister of Denise McNair and Dianne Braddock, sister of Carole Robertson look on May 24, 2013 in Washington, DC. The medal, the highest Congressional civilian honor, was given posthumously to Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley and Denise McNair who died September 15, 1963 when a bomb planted bywhite supremacists exploded exploded at the church. (Photo by Mike Theiler-Pool/Getty Images horizontal,usa,females,mother,child,girls,death,politics,barack obama,us president,international landmark,washington dc,gulf coast states,sister,oval office,mayor,south korea,birmingham – alabama,attorney general,eric holder,bombing,congressional gold medal,16th street baptist church bombing

6. 16th Street Baptist Church, site of a 1963 bombing that killed four girls in retaliation of the civil rights movement, Birmingham, Alabama

16th Street Baptist Church, site of a 1963 bombing that killed four girls in retaliation of the civil rights movement, Birmingham, Alabama

16th Street Baptist Church, site of a 1963 bombing that killed four girls in retaliation of the civil rights movement, Birmingham, Alabama. (Photo by: Universal Images Group via Getty Images) vertical,color image,usa,motion,city,death,gulf coast states,human interest,tower,church,protest,alabama,birmingham – alabama,segregation,revenge,black civil rights,black history in the us,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

7. Congressional Gold Medals Posthumously Awarded To Birmingham Bombing Victims

Congressional Gold Medals Posthumously Awarded To Birmingham Bombing Victims

U.S. House and Senate leaders posthumously present a Congressional Gold Medal to Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, victims of the 1963 Birmingham bombing. The medal is awarded in recognition of how their sacrifice served as a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement. (Pete Marovich/MCT via Getty Images) horizontal,usa,leadership,politics,washington dc,united states senate,victim,bombing,congressional gold medal

8. Congress Posthumously Honors Four Victims Of 1963 Birmingham Bombing

Congress Posthumously Honors Four Victims Of 1963 Birmingham Bombing

WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 10: Jewell Chris McNair attends a ceremony where his daughter, Denise McNair and three other girls were posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal at the U.S. Capitol September 10, 2013 in Washington, DC. Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley were killed September 15, 1963 when members of the Ku Klux Klan bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The medal honors the girls’ sacrifice and how it served as a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) attending,horizontal,usa,females,daughter,child,girls,politics,government,washington dc,award,ceremony,social issues,capitol building – washington dc,congressional gold medal

9. Congress Posthumously Honors Four Victims Of 1963 Birmingham Bombing

Congress Posthumously Honors Four Victims Of 1963 Birmingham Bombing

WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 10: Diane Robertson Braddock wears a necklace with the image of her sister, Carole Robertson, who was one of the four young girls who were killed in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing during a ceremony to award the girls with the Congressional Gold Medal at the U.S. Capitol September 10, 2013 in Washington, DC. Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley were killed September 15, 1963 when members of the Ku Klux Klan bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The medal honors the girls’ sacrifice and how it served as a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) horizontal,usa,image,females,child,girls,politics,government,washington dc,award,ceremony,sister,necklace,social issues,bombing,capitol building – washington dc,congressional gold medal,16th street baptist church bombing

10. Alabama, Birmingham, 16Th Street Baptist Church Stained Glass Window

Alabama, Birmingham, 16Th Street Baptist Church Stained Glass Window

Alabama, Birmingham, 16Th Street Baptist Church, Site Of 1963 Bombing, Stained Glass Window. (Photo by: Jeff Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images) vertical,photography,usa,window,gulf coast states,glass – material,human interest,stained glass,politics and government,alabama,bombing,black civil rights,black history in the us,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

11. Alabama, Birmingham, 16Th Street Baptist Church

Alabama, Birmingham, 16Th Street Baptist Church

Alabama, Birmingham, 16Th Street Baptist Church, Site Of 1963 Bombing. (Photo by: Jeff Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images) photography,horizontal,usa,gulf coast states,human interest,politics and government,alabama,bombing,black civil rights,black history in the us,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

12. The Congress of Racial Equality conducted march.

The Congress of Racial Equality conducted march.

Photograph of the Congress of Racial Equality conducted march in memory of Negro youngsters killed in Birmingham bombings. Dated 1963. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images) photography,horizontal,usa,african ethnicity,death,archival,human interest,equality,racism,1960-1969,alabama,bomb,bombing,20th century style,racial equality

13. Sidewalk Damaged by Bomb Blast

Sidewalk Damaged by Bomb Blast

African Americans sit on sidewalk littered with debris from a bomb blast at a nearby church which killed four children. vertical,photography,people,african-american ethnicity,sitting,child,death,built structure,archival,exploding,sidewalk,church,five people,social issues,racism,1960-1969,close to,bombing,accidents and disasters

14. National Guard Troops After Quelling Protest

National Guard Troops After Quelling Protest

National Guard troops rest after trying to calm a crowd participating in a violent protest sparked by the bombing of an African American meeting place and the home of Reverend A.D. King, brother to Martin Luther King, Jr. photography,people,horizontal,adult,resting,mid adult,males,sitting,caucasian ethnicity,men,30-39 years,mid adult men,archival,brother,crowd,meeting,social issues,army,army soldier,tranquility,violence,martin luther king jr.,protest,1960-1969,military uniform,bombing,national guard,black history in the us

15. Bomb Victim’s Mother Crying at Funeral Services

Bomb Victim’s Mother Crying at Funeral Services

The mother of a child killed when a bomb exploded at an African American church breaks down in tears during a funeral service for those killed in the bombing. vertical,photography,people,mother,child,girls,death,large group of people,crying,funeral,archival,exploding,church,social issues,racism,mourner,1960-1969,bomb,bombing

16. Men Searching Wreckage of Burned Building

Men Searching Wreckage of Burned Building

Men search through the ruins of building burned during a fire in Birmingham, Alabama sparked by racial tension. photography,people,horizontal,adult,men,three people,built structure,archival,gulf coast states,church,social issues,searching,1960-1969,burnt,fire – natural phenomenon,birmingham – alabama,bombing,accidents and disasters

17. Arrival of Alabama State Troopers in Birmingham

Arrival of Alabama State Troopers in Birmingham

After the bombing of an African American church which killed four children, Alabama State Troopers arrive in Birmingham to assist local officers. photography,people,horizontal,adult,arrival,mid adult,car,caucasian ethnicity,men,child,group of people,assistance,night,30-39 years,death,mid adult men,street,traffic,government,archival,blurred motion,church,social issues,racism,1960-1969,terrorism,surveillance,politics and government,bombing

18. Bombed Car in Front of Church

Bombed Car in Front of Church

A charred automobile sits outside of the 16th Street Baptist Church where followers of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. regularly meet. vertical,no people,photography,sitting,car,crime,archival,gulf coast states,following,social issues,martin luther king jr.,1960-1969,burnt,bombing,black history in the us,16th street baptist church – birmingham

19. Reverend. A.D. King Speaking at Violent Protest

Reverend. A.D. King Speaking at Violent Protest

Reverend A.D. King, brother of Martin Luther King, Jr. tries to calm a crowd participating in a violent protest sparked by the bombing of an African American meeting place on May 12, 1963. photography,people,horizontal,adult,males,men,throwing,archival,brother,crowd,meeting,social issues,tranquility,violence,martin luther king jr.,protest,clergy,1960-1969,protestor,public speaker,segregation,bombing,black history in the us,minister – clergy

20. Portrait of Former Klansman Bob Cherry

Portrait of Former Klansman Bob Cherry

(Original Caption) Bob Cherry, 47, a former Klansman from Birmingham, Alabama, was questioned 9/27 by Alabama Attorney General Bill Baxley about the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church which killed four young girls. Another former Klansman, Robert Chambliss, was arrested and charged 9/26 with four counts of murder in Birmingham. Baxley would not comment on his reasons for flying to Texas. vertical,photography,people,one person,portrait,headshot,child,girls,death,1970-1979,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,social issues,former,alabama,birmingham – alabama,attorney general,ku klux klan,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

21. Crowd Around Carol Robertson’s Casket

Crowd Around Carol Robertson’s Casket

Mourners crowd the entrance to St. John’s African Methodist Church as the casket containing the body of 14-year-old Carol Robertson from the church. Robertson and three other girls were killed in the bombing of the nearby Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. photography,people,horizontal,african-american ethnicity,funeral,archival,dead person,crowd,social issues,violence,coffin,mourner,1960-1969,murder,inside of,politics and government,bombing,desegregation,social movement

22. Mourners at Funeral

Mourners at Funeral

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin C. Robertson arrive for funeral services for their 14-year-old daughter Carol. She was one of four victims of a bomb explosion in the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church. photography,people,horizontal,adult,arrival,african-american ethnicity,females,car,mature adult,men,women,mother,daughter,group of people,lifestyles,funeral,archival,occupation,wife,church,social issues,celebration event,violence,grief,racism,mourner,1960-1969,husband,murder,bombing

23. Services for Birmingham Church Bombing Victim

Services for Birmingham Church Bombing Victim

(Original Caption) Birmingham, Alabama: Graveside services at Woodlawn cemetery as body of Cynthia Dianne Wesley was buried. Officiating ministers are at left; family at right. Moments later, similar services were held at another grave nearby for Addie Mae Collins. Both girls were victims of the 9/15/1963 bombing of a Negro church. photography,people,horizontal,adult,senior adult,african-american ethnicity,men,women,child,girls,cemetery,religion,boys,large group of people,funeral,archival,gulf coast states,dead person,occupation,social issues,celebration event,grief,mourner,1960-1969,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,desegregation,social movement

24. Relative Grieving Bombing Victims

Relative Grieving Bombing Victims

(Original Caption) Comforted. Birmingham, Alabama: attending the funeral services for the three girls killed in the September 15th bombing of a Negro church, family members comforts a younger relative as they lead her down the steps of the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church. vertical,photography,people,law,medium group of people,archival,pain,grief,1960-1969

25. Funeral for Church Bombing Victim

Funeral for Church Bombing Victim

(Original Caption) Mr. and Mrs. Alvin C. Robertson (center) hold hands as they leave St. John’s African Methodist Episcopal Church on 9/17 after attending funeral services for their 14-year-old daughter, Carol. The girl was killed with three classmates when a bomb exploded in the 16th Street Babtist Church during Sunday School services on 9/15. vertical,photography,people,attending,females,daughter,holding hands,politics,large group of people,serious,funeral,archival,occupation,social issues,leaving,1960-1969,politics and government

26. FBI Investigators at Bombed Birmingham Baptist Church

FBI Investigators at Bombed Birmingham Baptist Church

(Original Caption) Birmingham, Alabama: Grim faced crowd of Negroes watch (rear), as FBI bomb experts comb rubble-strewn street for clues to 9/15 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church. Four persons were killed in bombing; two others died in widespread racial violence incident which occured later. vertical,photography,people,adult,expertise,african-american ethnicity,mid adult,men,african ethnicity,30-39 years,mid adult men,large group of people,archival,gulf coast states,spectator,crowd,watching,social issues,curiosity,1960-1969,terrorism,birmingham – alabama,bomb,bombing,fbi,16th street baptist church – birmingham,accidents and disasters

27. Parents of Church Bombing Victim Carol Robertson

Parents of Church Bombing Victim Carol Robertson

(Original Caption) Birmingham, Alabama: Mr. & Mrs. Alvin C. Robertson, parents of 14-year-old Negro girl who was killed 9/15, when a bomb exploded in a Birmingham church, were overcome with emotion here as their daughter, Carol was buried. Negroes crowded into the church and spilled into the street as the funeral service began. Carol Robertson was one of four Negro children killed in the dynamite blast as they attended Sunday School. photography,people,horizontal,females,african ethnicity,daughter,child,girls,medium group of people,parent,archival,gulf coast states,exploding,social issues,celebration event,emotion,grief,1960-1969,birmingham – alabama,bomb

28. Funeral for Bombing Victim Carol Robertson

Funeral for Bombing Victim Carol Robertson

(Original Caption) Birmingham, Alabama: Faces of two unidentified Negro women are contorted by grief, as they weep at cemetery where body of 14-year-old Carol Robertson was buried 9/17. Child was one of four killed in 9/15 bombing of a Negro church. Funeral services for the other three are set for 9/18 afternoon. photography,people,horizontal,adult,african-american ethnicity,mid adult,women,african ethnicity,mid adult women,medium group of people,cemetery,crying,funeral,archival,gulf coast states,dead person,social issues,grief,mourner,1960-1969,birmingham – alabama,bombing,double-jointed

29. Reaction to Birmingham Bombing

Reaction to Birmingham Bombing

(Original Caption) 9/22/1963-New York, NY: Thousands gathered at a rally to protest the murder of the children of Birmingham and to demand federal protection of negro people. Photo shows guest speakers and others on platform joining hands and singing. Girls in foreground hold a white ‘coffin,’ symbolic of the dead children of Birmingham. Some of the people on the platform are James Baldwin, Medgar Evers, Rev. Thomas Kilgore, Jr., Bayard Rustin and Norman Thomas. Photo by Marty Hanley ORIGINAL CAPTION vertical,photography,people,author,new york city,african-american ethnicity,caucasian ethnicity,african ethnicity,abundance,child,group of people,government,large group of people,archival,protection,western script,social issues,demanding,violence,political rally,protest,1960-1969,murder,government minister,presidential candidate,socialist party,politics and government,gay man,bombing,black civil rights,bayard rustin,human rights,james arthur baldwin,medgar evers,lgbtqi rights,norman thomas

30. Police Truck Moving Toward Fire

Police Truck Moving Toward Fire

An armored police truck stands by ready to disperse rioters. Fires in the background were set by black rioters in retaliation for the bombing of Minister A.D. King’s home. King was the brother of Martin Luther King, Jr. no people,photography,horizontal,law,standing,preparation,archival,social issues,police force,conflict,1960-1969,riot,armored clothing,accidents and disasters

31. Abernathy,Shuttlesworth,King Walk Solemn

Abernathy,Shuttlesworth,King Walk Solemn

(Original Caption) 9/15/1963-Birmingham, AL: Negro leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. (center), of Atlanta, is flanked by solemn visaged Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth (l) and Rev. Ralph Abernathy after King arrived here to consult with Birmingham Negro leaders about the 9/15 bombing of a Negro church. ORIGINAL CAPTION vertical,photography,people,full length,african-american ethnicity,african ethnicity,group of people,archival,gulf coast states,walking,social issues,martin luther king jr.,1960-1969,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,black civil rights,black history in the us,human rights,fred shuttlesworth,ralph abernathy sr. – activist

32. Martin L. King Seated Addressing Camera

Martin L. King Seated Addressing Camera

(Original Caption) 9/16/1963-Birmingham, AL: Reverend Martin Luther King (C), flanked by Negro leaders Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth (R) and Dr. L.H. Pitts (L), calls on President Kennedy to send regular Army troops into this strife-torn city. King came here after the 9/15 bombing. (ORIGINAL CAPTION) photography,people,pattern,horizontal,african-american ethnicity,sitting,leadership,african ethnicity,group of people,city,politics,archival,gulf coast states,church,social issues,army,martin luther king jr.,1960-1969,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,public speaker,bombing,send,black civil rights,black history in the us,human rights,fred shuttlesworth

33. Martin Luther King Conducting Funeral Service

Martin Luther King Conducting Funeral Service

Dr. Martin Luther Jr., dressed in a black robe, with a beam of sunlight streaming through behind him, conducts a solemn funeral service for 3 young African American girls killed in a church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama. photography,people,horizontal,adult,african-american ethnicity,mid adult,men,high angle view,child,girls,30-39 years,death,religion,sunlight,mid adult men,large group of people,serious,funeral,archival,gulf coast states,clothing,church,social issues,clergy,mourner,1960-1969,birmingham – alabama,bombing,black history in the us

34. NEWS: SEP 15 Birmingham Empowerment Week Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement

NEWS: SEP 15 Birmingham Empowerment Week Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement

15 September 2013: US Attorney General Eric Holder and his wife, Sharon Malone, visit the Four Spirits statue before the memorial service at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church for the girls that were killed in the church bombing on September 15th, 1963. This program is part of Empowerment Week for the City of Birmingham celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. (Photo by Michael Wade/Icon SMI/Corbis via Getty Images) photography,horizontal,usa,adult,women,child,girls,gulf coast states,wife,human interest,visit,statue,memorial event,politics and government,attorney general,eric holder,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

35. Denver Post Archives

Denver Post Archives

SEP 22 1963 James Meredith ‘Bombing is a profession.’ James Meredith told a Denver audience of 1,400 Sunday not to be surprised if ‘many, many’ more are killed – like the children of Birmingham – in the civil rights struggle. Credit: Denver Post (Denver Post via Getty Images) vertical,photography,child,archival,audience,human interest,denver,struggle,1960-1969,sunday,politics and government,human rights

36. The Congress of Racial Equality conducted march.

The Congress of Racial Equality conducted march.

Photograph of the Congress of Racial Equality conducted march in memory of Negro youngsters killed in Birmingham bombings. Dated 1963. (Photo by: Photo 12/UIG via Getty Images) photography,horizontal,usa,african ethnicity,death,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,equality,racism,1960-1969,photograph,alabama,bomb,bombing,20th century,racial equality

37. Outside Arthur Shores’ Bombed Home

Outside Arthur Shores’ Bombed Home

A group of onlookers stand on a sidewalk in front of NAACP attorney Arthur Shores’ bomb-damaged home, Birmingham, Alabama, September 5, 1963. A sign on the lawn reads ‘Danger Keep Out.’ (Photo by Library of Congress/Interim Archives/Getty Images) photography,people,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,african ethnicity,city,north america,damaged,street,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,sidewalk,spectator,conflict,naacp,racism,1960-1969,lawyer,birmingham – alabama,bombing,black history in the us,bomb damage

38. The Wales Window for Alabama

The Wales Window for Alabama

The Wales Window for Alabama, Unveiling Ceremony, Thomson House, Cardiff, Wales, Thursday 4th February 1965. Unveiled by The Lord Mayor of Cardiff, Alderman WJ Hartland JP. The stained glass window, designed by John Petts, was funded by donations from the people of Wales, to replace one shattered in a bomb explosion at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, USA, on 15th September 1963, killing four young black girls, Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Carol Denise McNair. (Photo by Western Mail Archive/Mirrorpix/Getty Images) vertical,photography,uk,crime,window,archival,artist,ceremony,human interest,launch event,art,violence,1960-1969,terrorism,murder,wales,art product,cardiff – wales,ku klux klan,bombing,stained

39. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 05: 16th Street Baptist Church signage, site of the September 15, 1963 Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama on July 5, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) photography,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,architecture,gulf coast states,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

40. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 05: Stained glass windows at the 16th Street Baptist Church, site of the September 15, 1963 Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama on July 5, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) photography,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,window,architecture,gulf coast states,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

41. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 05: 16th Street Baptist Church signage, site of the September 15, 1963 Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama on July 5, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) vertical,photography,arts culture and entertainment,usa,architecture,gulf coast states,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

42. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 05: A Monument dedicated to the four girls killed in the September 15, 1963 Church bombing stands outside the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on July 5, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) vertical,photography,arts culture and entertainment,usa,child,girls,death,architecture,gulf coast states,dedication,monument,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

43. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Two men with swastika armbands march before the White House in Washington, DC, with a banner reading ‘We Mourn White Victims of Negro Crime’, September 1963. They are reacting to the protests against the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama by white supremacists, in which four girls were killed. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,horizontal,adult,adults only,only men,men,washington dc,black and white,archival,human interest,white house – washington dc,protest,1963,racism,banner – sign,fascism,marching,nazi swastika

44. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Comedian and activist Dick Gregory (1932 – 2017) addresses a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, September 1963. Behind him is a poster reading ‘No More Birminghams’, in reference to the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,people,one person,horizontal,adult,adults only,one man only,washington dc,comedian,black and white,activist,archival,human interest,speech,protest,1963,racism,terrorism,politics and government,poster,human rights,dick gregory – activist

45. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Men with swastika armbands march before the White House in Washington, DC, with placards reading ‘Negroes Murdered Whites’ etc, September 1963. They are reacting to the protests against the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama by white supremacists, in which four girls were killed. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,horizontal,adult,adults only,only men,men,washington dc,black and white,archival,human interest,police force,white house – washington dc,protest,1963,racism,banner – sign,fascism,placard,marching,nazi swastika

46. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Two men march before the White House in Washington, DC, with a banner reading ‘We Mourn White Victims of Negro Crime’, September 1963. They are reacting to the protests against the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama by white supremacists, in which four girls were killed. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) vertical,photography,adult,adults only,only men,men,washington dc,black and white,archival,human interest,white house – washington dc,protest,1963,racism,banner – sign,fascism,marching

47. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

People holding hands at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,people,horizontal,adult,men,women,african ethnicity,human body part,holding hands,washington dc,black and white,archival,gulf coast states,human limb,human arm,arms raised,limb,human interest,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

48. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Women holding hands at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,people,horizontal,adult,adults only,only women,caucasian ethnicity,women,african ethnicity,sunglasses,two people,holding hands,washington dc,black and white,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,crowd,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

49. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Women at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,horizontal,adult,adults only,only women,women,african ethnicity,washington dc,black and white,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,crowd,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

50. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Comedian and activist Dick Gregory (1932 – 2017) addresses a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) vertical,microphone,photography,people,one person,adult,adults only,one man only,washington dc,comedian,black and white,activist,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,speech,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights,dick gregory – activist

51. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Comedian and activist Dick Gregory (1932 – 2017) wearing a black armband at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) vertical,photography,people,one person,adult,adults only,one man only,washington dc,comedian,black and white,activist,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,protest,1963,mourning,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights,dick gregory – activist

52. Martin L. King Seated Addressing Camera

Martin L. King Seated Addressing Camera

(Original Caption) 9/16/1963-Birmingham, AL: Reverend Martin Luther King (C), flanked by Negro leaders Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth (R) and Dr. L.H. Pitts (L), calls on President Kennedy to send regular Army troops into this strife-torn city. King came here after the 9/15 bombing. (ORIGINAL CAPTION) photography,people,pattern,horizontal,african-american ethnicity,sitting,leadership,african ethnicity,group of people,city,politics,archival,gulf coast states,church,social issues,army,martin luther king jr.,1960-1969,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,public speaker,bombing,send,black civil rights,black history in the us,human rights,fred shuttlesworth

53. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 07: 16th Street Baptist Church, site of the September 15, 1963 Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama on July 7, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) photography,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,architecture,gulf coast states,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

54. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 05: A Monument dedicated to the four girls killed in the September 15, 1963 Church bombing stands outside the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on July 5, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) vertical,photography,arts culture and entertainment,usa,child,girls,death,architecture,gulf coast states,dedication,monument,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

55. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 05: 16th Street Baptist Church signage, site of the September 15, 1963 Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama on July 5, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) photography,arts culture and entertainment,horizontal,usa,architecture,gulf coast states,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

56. Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

Birmingham Cityscapes and City Views

BIRMINGHAM, AL – JULY 07: 16th Street Baptist Church signage, site of the September 15, 1963 Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama on July 7, 2018. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images) vertical,photography,arts culture and entertainment,usa,architecture,gulf coast states,alabama,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham

57. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Comedian and activist Dick Gregory (1932 – 2017) addresses a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, September 1963. Behind him is a poster reading ‘No More Birminghams’, in reference to the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,people,one person,horizontal,adult,adults only,one man only,washington dc,comedian,black and white,activist,archival,human interest,speech,protest,1963,racism,terrorism,politics and government,poster,human rights,dick gregory – activist

58. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Two men with swastika armbands march before the White House in Washington, DC, with a banner reading ‘We Mourn White Victims of Negro Crime’, September 1963. They are reacting to the protests against the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama by white supremacists, in which four girls were killed. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,horizontal,adult,adults only,only men,men,washington dc,black and white,archival,human interest,white house – washington dc,protest,1963,racism,banner – sign,fascism,marching,nazi swastika

59. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Women at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,horizontal,adult,adults only,only women,women,african ethnicity,washington dc,black and white,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,crowd,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

60. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Men with swastika armbands march before the White House in Washington, DC, with placards reading ‘Negroes Murdered Whites’ etc, September 1963. They are reacting to the protests against the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama by white supremacists, in which four girls were killed. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,horizontal,adult,adults only,only men,men,washington dc,black and white,archival,human interest,police force,white house – washington dc,protest,1963,racism,banner – sign,fascism,placard,marching,nazi swastika

61. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Women holding hands at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,people,horizontal,adult,adults only,only women,caucasian ethnicity,women,african ethnicity,sunglasses,two people,holding hands,washington dc,black and white,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,crowd,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

62. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

People holding hands at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) photography,people,horizontal,adult,men,women,african ethnicity,human body part,holding hands,washington dc,black and white,archival,gulf coast states,human limb,human arm,arms raised,limb,human interest,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights

63. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Comedian and activist Dick Gregory (1932 – 2017) wearing a black armband at a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) vertical,photography,people,one person,adult,adults only,one man only,washington dc,comedian,black and white,activist,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,protest,1963,mourning,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights,dick gregory – activist

64. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Two men march before the White House in Washington, DC, with a banner reading ‘We Mourn White Victims of Negro Crime’, September 1963. They are reacting to the protests against the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama by white supremacists, in which four girls were killed. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) vertical,photography,adult,adults only,only men,men,washington dc,black and white,archival,human interest,white house – washington dc,protest,1963,racism,banner – sign,fascism,marching

65. Washington Protest

Washington Protest

Comedian and activist Dick Gregory (1932 – 2017) addresses a civil rights demonstration in Washington, DC, in the aftermath of the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by white supremacists, September 1963. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) vertical,microphone,photography,people,one person,adult,adults only,one man only,washington dc,comedian,black and white,activist,archival,gulf coast states,human interest,speech,protest,1963,politics and government,birmingham – alabama,bombing,16th street baptist church – birmingham,human rights,dick gregory – activist

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